Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays: Dumplin!

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays

3-books-of-diversity

Welcome back to  our #diversity countdown to Christmas. Our third book is Dumplin by Julie Murphy.

dumplin

Self-proclaimed fat girl Willowdean Dickson (dubbed “Dumplin’” by her former beauty queen mom) has always been at home in her own skin. Her thoughts on having the ultimate bikini body? Put a bikini on your body. With her all-American beauty best friend, Ellen, by her side, things have always worked…until Will takes a job at Harpy’s, the local fast-food joint. There she meets Private School Bo, a hot former jock. Will isn’t surprised to find herself attracted to Bo. But she is surprised when he seems to like her back.

Instead of finding new heights of self-assurance in her relationship with Bo, Will starts to doubt herself. So she sets out to take back her confidence by doing the most horrifying thing she can imagine: entering the Miss Clover City beauty pageant—along with several other unlikely candidates—to show the world that she deserves to be up there as much as any twiggy girl does. Along the way, she’ll shock the hell out of Clover City—and maybe herself most of all.

You might not classify this book as diversity but I do. Although Will is white, she is a large girl. A fat girl, in her own words. And we all know how teens can suffer if they are deemed fat. What I love about Will is that she doesn’t hate her body like many fat girls, but she also has an edge to her; in a I’m going to reject you before you reject me sort of way. And also, she becomes sort of a hero to the other misfit girls at the school. A reluctant hero to a group of misfits who have bad attitudes.  Also? Texas!

I know I’m tired of the fat best friend trope, aren’t you? Here’s one that breaks that.

Also? It’s a Netflix movie! Have you seen it?

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 3: Dumplin by Julie Murphy

The 12 Books of #Diversity
for the Holidays
Day Three

3-books-of-diversity

Welcome back to  our #diversity countdown to Christmas. Our third book is Dumplin by Julie Murphy.

dumplin

Self-proclaimed fat girl Willowdean Dickson (dubbed “Dumplin’” by her former beauty queen mom) has always been at home in her own skin. Her thoughts on having the ultimate bikini body? Put a bikini on your body. With her all-American beauty best friend, Ellen, by her side, things have always worked…until Will takes a job at Harpy’s, the local fast-food joint. There she meets Private School Bo, a hot former jock. Will isn’t surprised to find herself attracted to Bo. But she is surprised when he seems to like her back.

Instead of finding new heights of self-assurance in her relationship with Bo, Will starts to doubt herself. So she sets out to take back her confidence by doing the most horrifying thing she can imagine: entering the Miss Clover City beauty pageant—along with several other unlikely candidates—to show the world that she deserves to be up there as much as any twiggy girl does. Along the way, she’ll shock the hell out of Clover City—and maybe herself most of all.

You might not classify this book as diversity but I do. Although Wil is white, she is a large girl. A fat girl, in her own words. And we all know how teens can suffer if they are deemed fat. What I love about Wil is that she doesn’t hate her body like many fat girls, but she also has an edge to her; in a I’m going to reject you before you reject me sort of way. And also, she becomes sort of a hero to the other misfit girls at the school. A reluctant hero to a group of misfits who have bad attitudes.  Also? Texas!

I know I’m tired of the fat best friend trope, aren’t you? Here’s one that breaks that.

Categories
Books

What’s In My Ear? #FridayListens

What’s In My Ear?

whatsinmyear

What have I been listening to lately?

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

American Gods

What are you listening to?

Categories
Books

What’s In My Ear? #FridayListens

What’s In My Ear?

whatsinmyear

What have I been listening to lately?

Please Ignore Vera Dietz by AS King

41k2xlwkpgl-_sl80_

Wow was this good!

Have you read it?

Categories
Books

Discover Black History Month with Shonda Rhimes

Discover Black History Month with Shonda Rhimes

You know Shonda Rhimes, right? She’s the Queen of Thursday night TV.

She’s wrote Grey’s Anatomy

greys anatomy

and Scandal

scandal

and How to Get Away with Murder

murder

I haven’t watched any of these TV shows  (don’t judge me, I’m reading) but what I
do know her for is her book Year of Yes.

Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes

and it’s BRILLIANT!!

It’s so good I listened to it TWICE. Back to Back on audio. In fact, I’m considering
buying a hard copy so I can highlight and take notes.

That’s how freakin good it is.

It’s the self help book that reads like a funny autobiography.

Shonda shares insights into her personal struggles and how she overcame them, as well
as insights about life. Shonda will be my book bestie forever. She’s not afraid to let her geek flag fly.
In fact, it’s her geek flag that’s made Thursday into Shonday.  AMIRIGHT?

How many times have you  seen your Facebook timeline light up with Scandal discussions on Thursday nights?  For me? Every Thursday, and I have no idea what they’re talking about.  I’m sure I’d love Scandal or the other shows but I don’t want to give up my reading time. I’m trying to get to the 10,000 mark here.  But anyway, if a woman who OWNS Thursday night can offer some tidbits of information on how to live a better life, I’m all about it.

Besides, her birthday is in January, a few days away from mine so we’re practically TWINSIES!

So wave your books in the air and salute Shonda Rhimes today for Black History Month.

PS Shonda?

You rock way harder than Beyonce.

Categories
2015 Diversity Reading Challenge Books

The Only Ones by Carola Dibbell a ListenUp Audio review

Every once in a while a book comes along and BAM! You lose your mind over it.  That’s what happened to me with The only Ones by Carola Dibbell. The gracious folks at ListenUp audiobooks shared this little gem with me and I’m smitten. SMITTEN!

21535525

 

Please don’t let the cover throw you off.  If you like spec fic like I do, this is the book for you! Young Inez lives in a post apocalyptic New York City where people are dying from diseases. Check it out:

Inez wanders a post-pandemic world, strangely immune to disease, making her living by volunteering as a test subject. She is hired to provide genetic material to a grief-stricken, affluent mother, who lost all four of her daughters within four short weeks. This experimental genetic work is policed by a hazy network of governmental ethics committees, and threatened by the Knights of Life, religious zealots who raze the rural farms where much of this experimentation is done.

When the mother backs out at the last minute, Inez is left responsible for the product, which in this case is a baby girl, Ani. Inez must protect Ani, who is a scientific breakthrough, keeping her alive, dodging authorities and religious fanatics, and trying to provide Ani with the childhood that Inez never had, which means a stable home and an education.

So…Inez makes a living as a test subject.  She’s kind of like a hooker for genetic material.  Unreal! There’s talk of genetic testing the likes you can only dream of: cloning, test tube babies, etc, it’s VERY CLEVER! Inez becomes a good mother. No wait, scratch that and EXCELLENT mother and is tender, funny, and oh so relatable. I mean, who knows what the heck they’re doing when they first become a parent?

Inez appears to be of Hispanic descent, although she doesn’t know her true identity. Inez is named after the bus stop where she was found and the last name of the woman who cared for her: Inez Casina Fardo. Excuse the spelling but I love the idea of where the name comes from. After all, what’s in a name? An atypical Hispanic woman? Definitely a Diversity Challenge book!

The best bit about the audiobook is the narrator. She has this New York accent that at times grates my nerves so bad (as many NY accents do) but is so believable I can’t imagine the book being read in any other voice. Period.

This book ranks right up there with Ready Player One for me. Plus, it’s not that difficult to imagine a post pandemic NYC.

Categories
Young Adult

What’s In My Ear: #FridayReads

FridayReads Leviathan

 

There’s so much to love about this version of Leviathan that I don’t know where to begin! Let’s just say the irony of listening to this audiobook (love AUDIBLE.COM!) is not lost on me. Westerfeld is an American, although his English colloquialisms seem spot on, the narrator is Alan Cumming (YAY!) who is Scottish, invigorating the characters with English, Scottish, German, and Austrian accents. Utterly BRILLIANT.

Alan can read the dictionary for all I care. I’m TEMPTED to download all of his audiobooks; would that be creepy? Do I care?

Categories
Lists

Month in Review: January 2015

January in Review

MONTHINREVIEW Jan15

How was your January?

Categories
Books Children

#TuesdayReads: Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

It’s no secret by now that I LOVE listening to audio books. I am especially keen on listening to them in my car on my iPhone though my Audible.com app.  I just recently read Inkheart by Cornelia Funke and I was SMITTEN. So smitten in fact that I dragged out the end as long as I could.

Inkheart

Surely you’ve done that too? Prolonged the ending because you don’t want to finish the book? What’s even a more compelling reason to not finish a book is if the reader is phenomenal. The reader of Inkheart is Lynne Redgrave and OH does she bring the characters to life! Here’s a little bit about Inkheart:

Twelve-year-old Meggie learns that her father, who repairs and binds books for a living, can “read” fictional characters to life when one of those characters abducts them and tries to force him into service.

Characters from books literally leap off the page in this engrossing fantasy. Meggie has had her father to herself since her mother went away when she was young. Mo taught her to read when she was five, and the two share a mutual love of books. He can “read” characters out of books. When she was three, he read aloud from a book called Inkheart and released characters into the real world. At the same time, Meggie’s mother disappeared into the story. This “story within a story” will delight not just fantasy fans, but all readers who like an exciting plot with larger-than-life characters.

 

Inkheart is for anyone who loves books. Anyone who eats, sleeps, and breathes books because they love them so much. All of your odd bookish habits would not seem so odd if you shared them with Meggie; she has her own way of behaving towards books.  It’s like they’re in your mind behaving as you would behave.  Lynne Redgrave and Funke (the author) create a world that envelopes you like a literary hug and stays in your brain long after you’ve stopped listening to the book.  The characters became people with feelings you could predict and villains you could hate.

I encourage everyone who loves books to read this one. You’re never too young or too old to get carried away by good writing. This writing is good. Exceptional.

And I pity the fool who reads Tinkerbell out of Peter Pan, don’t you?  Have you read Inkheart? What about any of the followup books?

Categories
Books

What’s in My Ear? Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

How many of you love audiobooks? I love that I can take an audiobook with me everywhere and plug in, even if it’s just for a few moments. I’m never too far away from a good read (or listen, haha). My latest audiobook from Audible is called Fangirl and it’s by Rainbow Rowel.

Here’s my video review: