Categories
Books Children Reviews

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

In honor of my upcoming Blogoversary, here is my very first post. Again. I’m so proud!

One of my earliest recollections of books is The Snowy Day, by Ezra Jack Keats. I’m sure I’ve read it a million and half times since.  How delightful it was (and still is) to read a book and see a child who resembles me!  Back then I don’t recall there being too many books with children any color other than white.  Currently, the situation has improved but still can make more improvements.  Not only is The Snowy Day a wonderful book because it features a child of color, it is also a wonderful book because the story is gently told, easy to read, and visually appealing.  The story appeals to children of all ethnicity and socioeconomic backgrounds because any child can find something about the story to relate to. Perhaps the child is preschool age and they can relate to young Peter’s discoveries outside by himself because he’s a big boy.  Older children can relate to the story because the words are easy enough for them to read for themselves.  Other children might be able to relate because they’ve made snow angels or because they live in an apartment like Peter or because their mother’s make them take a bath after playing outside.  I believe the possibilities of comparison are limitless.

The story appeals to children of all ethnicity and socioeconomic backgrounds because any child can find something about the story to relate to. Perhaps the child is preschool age and they can relate to young Peter’s discoveries outside by himself because he’s a big boy.  Older children can relate to the story because the words are easy enough for them to read for themselves.  Other children might be able to relate because they’ve made snow angels or because they live in an apartment like Peter or because their mother’s make them take a bath after playing outside.  I believe the possibilities of comparison are limitless.

How shocked I am to discover that Ezra Jack Keats was not African American!  I never bothered to check the author’s ethnicity because I just assumed he was African American given the multicultural nature of his books.  Keats, in fact, is of Jewish descent and grew up in Depression Era New York City.  It is perhaps this upbringing that helped Keats understand the plight of the non-mainstream child.

If it’s been a while since you’ve looked at this book, pull it out and enjoy it, I guarantee it will put a smile on your face.

Categories
Books Children Reviews

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

In honor of my Blogoversary, here is my very first post. Again. I’m so proud!

Today marks the opening of my new blog.  I am cross posting this book review in hopes that you will pay me some bloggy love! Oh by the way, here is the link to my new blog: http://unconventionallibrarian.com.

One of my earliest recollections of books is The Snowy Day, by Ezra Jack Keats. I’m sure I’ve read it a million and half times since.  How delightful it was (and still is) to read a book and see a child who resembles me!  Back then I don’t recall there being too many books with children any color other than white.  Currently, the situation has improved but still can make more improvements.  Not only is The Snowy Day a wonderful book because it features a child of color, it is also a wonderful book because the story is gently told, easy to read, and visually appealing.  The story appeals to children of all ethnicity and socioeconomic backgrounds because any child can find something about the story to relate to. Perhaps the child is preschool age and they can relate to young Peter’s discoveries outside by himself because he’s a big boy.  Older children can relate to the story because the words are easy enough for them to read for themselves.  Other children might be able to relate because they’ve made snow angels or because they live in an apartment like Peter or because their mother’s make them take a bath after playing outside.  I believe the possibilities of comparison are limitless.

How shocked I am to discover that Ezra Jack Keats was not African American!  I never bothered to check the author’s ethnicity because I just assumed he was African American given the multicultural nature of his books.  Keats, in fact, is of Jewish descent and grew up in Depression Era New York City.  It is perhaps this upbringing that helped Keats understand the plight of the non mainstream child.

If it’s been a while since you’ve looked at this book, pull it out and enjoy it, I guarantee it will put a smile on your face.

Categories
Blogging from A to Z Challenge Books

Blogging A to Z: P-Peter’s Chair Ezra Jack Keats

unconventional librarian

Let me just get this out of the way that the letter P

is probably my favorite letter

for obvious reasons, right?

P is for Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats

Poor Peter finds all of his baby things being taken over by his new baby sister and he isn’t too happy about it.

What’s a guy to do?

Fortunately, mom and dad show Peter how special he is

and Peter gives his favorite chair

to his sister.

(sigh)

Who doesn’t love this book?

and the YAY! Award goes to the letter P because during

the A to Z Challenge, I made a new friend and met a new book

The Princelings of the East was written by my new friend Jemima Pett

I haven’t read the book (yet!) but according to Amazon.com

“The Princelings of the East is the first of a trilogy telling of the adventures of Fred and George.

When the King’s Birthday feast is ruined by an unnatural power drain, our Princeling heroes leave their scientific experiments to set out in search of answers. They encounter the enigmatic businessman Hugo, the impressive Prince of Buckmore, the wise Lady Nimrod, the irrepressible barkeep Victor, but find themselves threatened by those with vested interests. The scene shifts from a rural, feudal setting to the towers and heights of the curious Isle of Hattan, but where, or when, are they? Time is of the essence in solving this puzzle, and our heroes must keep their wits sharp and their heads clear if they are to survive.

Suitable for ages 8 and over, The Princelings of the East is a fantasy adventure with the charm of the Wind in the Willows in a world reminiscent of Anne MacCaffrey’s Pern.”

Wind in the Willows? I remember loving that book!

I can’t wait to read this book. Maybe I can talk the author into visiting? Cross your fingers!

Tomorrow’s letter is Q.

That’s a tough one, folks…

Categories
Books

Monday March Madness Bracket

Like everyone else, PammyPam likes to have fun and play games. I know very little about sports, but that doesn’t mean I wanna be left out of the festivities!

That said, I have created my own March Madness bracket: Unconventional Librarian style

Unconventional Librarian Bracket

You’ll notice my bracket is incomplete. That’s because I’m having trouble narrowing down the possibly winner. To be sure, I understand statistics and probabilities but that doesn’t make the choice any easier.

Let’s examine the bracket, ok?

You’ll see I have some good authors pitted against each other.  YA and children’s authors mixed in; some dead, some not.  The author death bears little weight  on their standing, as you can see, because Keats (that’s Ezra Jack) died over two decades ago but is IN THE LEAD against Jerry Spinelli and Avi.

How is that possible? Well, it’s kind of like Moneyball.  I call it Moneybooks (chuckle).  When determining what authors should move up, I looked at not only the number of books published but also the reach of the novels under her belt.  Take Louisa May Alcott.  Good author.  Dead lots of years.  But as of now and probably for eternity her books will remain timeless.  Natalie Babbitt, great storyteller, but hasn’t reached that status yet.  And since she’s still alive, there is still time for her to compete in years to come.

Same kind of consideration on the other side.  Spinelli against Avi.  Avi’s good. Spinelli’s good. Spinelli speaks to the John Q Kid in all of us. Everykid, if you will, that perhaps Margaret Wise Brown does not.

Looking over the bracket, I’ve noticed it’s YA against Early Childhood.  Who will win? Who has the most staying power?

Who should be my final TWO?  HELP!

Tell me what your thoughts are.

 

Categories
Books

Winter Resources for the Little Ones II

Just in case you missed these cuties,

here they are again!

Here are some picture books that I think are just perfect for winter or winter in July!

All you need for a Snowman by Alice Schertle

the book is darling, however, limited multiculturally.

I like that the words are repetitive and the Little ones listening can anticipate and call out what comes next…

The Biggest, Best Snowman by Margery Cuyler

This book is awesome because even though the main character is told she’s too little,

she makes the best snowman ever which should be inspiring for the littlest readers (listeners)!

Of course Jan Brett’s The Mitten would make my list!

Animals and old world charm are delightful.

and FINALLY

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

Goes without saying, right?

enjoy!

Categories
Books Diversity

Thrift Store (sort of) SCORE!

Last weekend Pumpkin and I were doing some back to school shopping at a shopping center we’d never been to before.  To our delight, there was a discount bookstore there! We love getting books on the cheap and while these books werent as cheap as say the Goodwill (often $.35) it was still a deal too good to pass up.

Here’s what I scored:

In case you can’t see:

  • Biscuit Goes to School
  • My Lucky Day
  • Whistle for Willie
  • Hi Cat

I’m super excited about these books for lots of reasons.  Biscuit is an easy book for little ones to identify with.  I’ve already shared it with the class because our theme was Back To School this week.

I’m always ALWAYS on the lookout for Ezra Jack Keats titles and had to restrain myself to only buy the two. Turns out these titles were a little too much for my tods but so what, I STILL love Ezra Jack Keats’ multiculturalism!

And finally, My Lucky Day is a funny book my co-teacher turned me onto: a clever little pig who “accidentally”  shows up at a fox’s house.  The fox thinks the pig will be his dinner, but the pig is more clever than that.  I bought this copy to replace the one she shared with the classroom. Kids love love LOVE to read “teacher books” and while they try to be careful, accidents happen and they were begging to “read” her book.

What books have you bought lately?  Any thrift store scores?

 

 

Categories
Books Diversity

Black History Month – Peter’s Chair

“Peter stretched as high as he could.  There! His tall building was finished.”

Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats is the CUTEST book around for children and parents experiencing the joyful addition of another child into the house.  Peter, however, is none too thrilled to have a little sister who uses all his old baby things: his crib, his high chair, etc.

I’ve reviewed Ezra Jack Keats before and I love the multicultural vibe he brings. He purposely choose an ethnic variety for his main characters, and this was over 40 years ago! It’s only natural that I should review Peter’s Chair for Black History Month.  The author is Jewish and the main character is African American; I LOVE the diversity!

If you’ve not read this book, you MUST DO IT NOW!! It is delightful and easy for kids to understand; all kids everywhere can relate to being dethroned by a little sib.

I give this book four paws!

Have you read it? What do you think? Any suggestions for books about adding siblings and sibling rivalry?