Categories
Children

Brave Like Me by Barbara Kerley

Brave Like Me

Brave Like Me is such a great book. It’s one of those books for littles that I wish they’d written sooner. Large color photographs containing people of all shapes and colors represent the members of the military who serve our countries. Let’s not the little ones left behind at home to hold down the fort and their feelings while Mom or Dad is gone.  I love how the book tells the children that they are brave too. I can’t even imagine what a child feels when they’re separated from a parent knowing that they might be in some danger. Brave is a good word to describe it. Because otherwise a little one might break down and cry for fear of not understanding, right? So sensitive and perfect for families of military.

Categories
Books

Paws of Courage by Nancy Furstinger

There are many ways to show courage.
Here’s how dogs do it:
Paws of Courage by Nancy Furstinger

Paws of Courage

 

Here’s a great kids book: it’s a book about war dogs and working dogs. But here’s the question: is there anything better than photos of dogs in uniforms? Well besides being awfully cute, these furry friends in uniform are brave. Paws of Courage is a great book that showcases the many types of four legged heroes who help our military over the past century. From Sgt Stubby to Xanto, dogs have performed numerous jobs helping our men and women in uniform. The greatest bit about these dogs is that when they retire, they can get adopted! Usually their handlers adopt them and reward them with love and good dog treats as a way of thanking the pooches for protecting them. Sometimes, regular people get to adopt a retired military working dog.

Can you imagine the stories old Fido could tell about finding explosives in a mine field or sniffing luggage at the airport for hidden items? Or what about the dog who can hear an enemy plane approaching and alert her military friends so they can get to safety?

I’ve always been a fan dogs, but military working dogs have become my all time favorite, after I heard about all the work they did during September 11th. If you have a friend who likes dogs or the military, this book will win their heart too. Also? Information in the back to find out about retired service dogs for sale.  Maybe you can get one!

Here’s a great quote from the book:

 

The Final Woof

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.

~Anonymous

 

 

 

Categories
Books

More Thoughts on Manners

More Thoughts on Manners

The weather around here has been absolutely dreadful and it seems that the East Coast is sharing its misery with many parts of the country.  Just recently I learned that many people in Atlanta were hit by snowstorm Leon (we were hit with Janus a week back) and the city was crippled.  The shutdown of the city made me think about human nature.  Citizens went out of their way to help others in distress:

  • School workers staying to care for stranded students
  • Drug store employees opening up store for overnight patrons
  • Drivers helping other drivers stuck or sliding on icy roads

This kind of thoughtful behavior warms my heart.  This is a level of common decency that I wish we saw more of.  To be sure, society is much more casual than in my parents’ heyday.  Heck, even in the 90s men still opened doors for women entering buildings.  But then again, I was living in the Texas, which is a whole ‘nother country, as the saying goes. To be sure, modern feminists argue that they don’t need a man to open a door for them or pull out a chair, can we see a little more common decency in the every day world and not just during emergencies?

Wonder why I’m being so serious and thoughtful? It’s because of this book: Modern Manners: Tools to Take You to the Top by Dorothea Johnson.

modern manners

In the 90s I worked on an Air Force base interacting with high ranking men and women. Outside of the military this might not seem like much to you, but imagine them to be like minor celebrities in your world. So, at this military installation you cannot address Donna by her first name when in public. You must call her title (rank actually): Sergeant Smith or Captain Smith, etc.  I learned this lesson the hard way and it only took one admonishment to help me retain it. You could relate this situation to addressing your church’s religious leader, pastor or priest by their first name in public. This, my friends, is not done. Even though Father John or Reverend Smith might have been at your house for dinner last night, he’s still addressed by his title in public. And the fact that you know this and follow this rule is called manners. Easy, huh?

Not convinced? Think of the number of people who still address their parents and grandparents by affectionate titles. You don’t hear too many 50 year old women calling their own mothers Doris, do you? Of course not! This rule does not apply to the families who call their parents by their first names. My son has a friend who calls her parents by their first names. It’s a foreign concept to my family but my son respects his friend’s wishes and calls her parents by their first names also. See? There is that word again: respect.

Here’s a sticky question for you: Now that you’re an adult, how do you greet adults who were your teachers when you were a kid?  As an adult I’ve reconnected with some of my high school band teacher on Facebook and joined the crowd by calling him by his first name.  How very weird it felt at first. Aw heck who am I kidding, still does.

What about you? Still calling Mr. and Mrs So and so by their last names? Why or why not?