Categories
Tea Parties

Western Tea Party

Yee haw! Recently we hosted a tea party for all my fave buckaroos! I grabbed my tutu, shined up my cowperson boots, and topped it all off with my sheriff’s hat.  As Leah said: we had a rootin tootin tea! Take a look at some of the pics.

12022583_420187934834455_1505992660374177233_o 11990502_420188258167756_6380051306146901284_n Cowboy Camp by Tammi Sauer 11224120_420189714834277_8611895961922532657_n

The little cowpokes that came were dressed so adorably I almost screamed.  The book, Cowboy Camp was so fun: it’s a bout a little feller who goes to camp but doesn’t like the food and is allergic to the animals but somehow manages to defeat the bad guy (Black Bart. Not real happy with that name but that’s another conversation)!

My partner, Leah, is so creative and I had a durn good time practicing my Texas accent and trying not to slip and fall in my boots. How DO cowboys walk in those things? My dogs were barking at the end of the party!

I know y’all are dying to see me in my get up, aren’t ya?

Here t’is.

Sheriff Pam

See ya’ll next time!

Categories
Adult Fiction Books

Towne Book Center & Cafe Book Club: May- My Korean Deli

This month at Towne Book Center & Cafe‘s book club read My Korean Deli by Ben Ryder Howe

mykorean deli

I hafta say it wasn’t my fave.  I didn’t hate it, but I just couldn’t relate to the main character.  Here’s a blurb from Goodreads:

It starts with a gift, when Ben Ryder Howe’s wife, the daughter of Korean immigrants, decides to repay her parents’ self-sacrifice by buying them a store. Howe, an editor at the rarefied Paris Review, agrees to go along. Things soon become a lot more complicated. After the business struggles, Howe finds himself living in the basement of his in-laws’ Staten Island home, commuting to the Paris Review offices in George Plimpton’s Upper East Side townhouse by day, and heading to Brooklyn at night to slice cold cuts and peddle lottery tickets. My Korean Deli follows the store’s tumultuous life span, and along the way paints the portrait of an extremely unlikely partnership between characters with shoots across society, from the Brooklyn streets to Seoul to Puritan New England. Owning the deli becomes a transformative experience for everyone involved as they struggle to salvage the original gift—and the family—while sorting out issues of values, work, and identity.

Even though I couldn’t relate to the character, I am eager to see what a New York deli looks like inside.  I will go in search of a deli when I’m in New York later this month to attend Book Expo America.  Stay tuned…