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Diversity Reading Challenge

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays Day 7

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays

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On the Seventh day of diversity, we bring you: Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi’s memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah’s regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran’s last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane’s child’s-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.

Fall in love is right. Marjane is smart and funny. In a country where I don’t believe that is valued. I can’t stop talking enough about this book!

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 7 – Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

The 12 Books of #Diversity
for the Holidays Day Seven

7-books-of-diversity

On the Seventh day of diversity, we bring you: Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi’s memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah’s regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran’s last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane’s child’s-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.

Fall in love is right. Marjane is smart and funny. In a country where I don’t believe that is valued. I can’t stop talking enough about this book!

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2015 Diversity Reading Challenge Banned Books

Banned Books Week: Have you read Persepolis?

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And here’s a title I’ve been meaning to read (I KNOW!)

2)      Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

  Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Here’s another important book that I feel like teens need to read in order to gain insight
into the lives of kids in the Middle East. Here’s why it’s continually challenged: Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions”

I just can’t EVEN with these people. If you’ve read this it qualifies as a diversity read.

PS. GRAPHIC NOVEL!!

Categories
Banned Books

Banned Books Week Giveaway Hop: The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq

Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom To Read

All this week I’ll be celebrating banned books week by highlighting challenged or banned books. Why is banned books week important? According to the American Library Association (of which I’m a member),

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship.

As a parent, you have a right to decide what your own children should be exposed to, but I strongly believe that you do not have the right to dictate what other children have access to. So, let’s celebrate the books that have been challenged and see if you’ve read any of them and you can make the decision for yourself. Each day of Banned Books Week I’ll highlight several of the titles that were challenged or banned last year. Let’s see how they stack up.  Also? This is a blog hop so I’ll giveaway a $10 Amazon gift card to the winner!

Let’s look at titles from the Middle East Today.

The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq

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There is so much to learn about the Middle Eastern region and so little time to read.

Alia Muhammad Baker is a librarian in Basra, Iraq. For fourteen years, her library has been a meeting place for those who love books. Until now. Now war has come, and Alia fears that the library–along with the thirty thousand books within it–will be destroyed forever.

In a war-stricken country where civilians–especially women–have little power, this true story about a librarian’s struggle to save her community’s priceless collection of books reminds us all how, throughout the world, the love of literature and the respect for knowledge know no boundaries. Illustrated by Jeanette Winter in bright acrylic and ink.

Sounds great, right? Other people obviously don’t feel the same way and have challenged the book “because of violent illustrations and storyline” which  is rather irrational because what would kind of story do you expect to hear when reading about a war torn country? Perhaps the age group was not appropriate for the book.

Another book about growing up in war ravaged countries?

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood

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Persepolis is another example of a book I’ve been meaning to read.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane’s child’s-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family.

This challenge and ban is particularly interesting; it was removed from the shelves  due to “graphic illustrations and language” and concerns about “developmental preparedness” and “student readiness.” The students, however, took to social media and traditional media voicing their displeasure with the school’s decision, which was eventually overturned.

Again, we should read these and judge for ourselves.  Have you read either of these titles?

Don’t forget to enter the giveaway:

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