Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

Power Girls: Young Women of Color who Kick Ass

Power Girls: Young Women of Color
who Kick Ass

You didn’t ask for it but here it is. A list of books featuring young women of color. They are strong, they are powerful, they are smart, they make friends. They are more than the stereotypical “pretty” girl.

Here we go:

Marjane

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

Sunny

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

 

Sierra

Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older

Julia

I am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter
by Erika L Sanchez

 

Sandra

How Dare the Sun Rise by Sandra Uwiringiyimana

 

Starr

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

 

Sonia, Tara, Shanti, Anna

You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins

 

Xiomara

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

 

Patty

Patina by Jason Reynolds

Zelie

The Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

 

Zuri

Pride by Ibi Zoboi

 

Bri

On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Layla

Internment by Samira Ahmed

 

Need a role model for a book report? That’s  about a dozen POWERFUL young women to choose from. Hey! That’s one Power Girl for every month of the year! And they’d all qualify for the Diversity Reading Challenge!

Have any power girls to add? Let me know here or hit me on Twitter: @pamlovesbooks

Categories
Diversity Diversity Reading Challenge

Discover your Next Read Black History Month: A Round-Up

Black History Month: A Round-Up

I’m not the only person writing about Black History Month so I thought I would share some blog posts written by my friends from around the internet.

My friend Sussu shares a few of her faves:

Dancing in the wingsMost African-American picture books are about feeling grand, having super powers, liking oneself and about looks. They often portray characters who need to feel better about themselves, who show how to accept oneself and how to be proud of who they are.

Some African-American books are also about famous people and slavery.

The books I read in the USA are so different from the books I have grown up with in France, a country with many African influences, especially since the colonial times. The African tales I read and was told about are populated with tales born in Africa and passed on from generation to generation. These tales hint at the folklore, the culture, the nature, the bravery of African people, the feats they have to overcome. Oftentimes the characters were brave, especially when they had to face witches and wild animals. Often the characters were wise and cunning. They also talked to trees, to animals, and to rivers. These tales were also filled with animal tales as in Africa each animal symbolises a quality. I also learned of the savanna, the desert, the fishermen and African villages, of healers, chiefs, and spriritual leaders, of communities and griots (the living libraries). These tales talked about cultures that live overseas.

 

Sussu highlights Kadir Nelson’s illustrations in this post and you KNOW how much I love him! For more of this post, check her out at https://sussu.weebly.com/

Another topic to discuss during Black History Month is the diversity of POC. Not all POC  practice the same religion. That’s why it’s important to include people who identify as Muslim. After all, they are people of color too. Muslim children, especially need to see themselves portrayed positively. Sussu highlights an absolutely ADORABLE book called Nanni’s Hijab.

Nanni is quite the attraction at school with her beautiful hijabs, so it doesn’t come as a surprise when one of her classmates is unappreciative. It is hard for new kids to see all the attention drawn to someone else because, after all, being new should be something that gets people’s attention. Soon, the new classmate, Leslie, tries to bully Nanni, but instead of retaliating, Nanni finds a smart way to solve the issue.  And it’s truly inspiring.

 

It’s a beautifully illustrated picture book that celebrates the hijab and is perfect for all littles: windows and mirrors, remember? Read more about Nanni’s Hijab here.

And speaking of representing Muslims, Sussu features a list of YA books with Muslim characters which includes the new Ms Marvel! Check it out!

Remember, diversity is for everyone. We all learn and grow when we read diverse books.  All of these titles would qualify for the Diversity Reading Challenge!

 

 

Categories
Diversity Diversity Reading Challenge

Discover your Next Read Black History Month: A Round-Up

Black History Month: A Round-Up

I’m not the only person writing about Black History Month so I thought I would share some blog posts written by my friends from around the internet.

My friend Sussu shares a few of her faves:

Dancing in the wingsMost African-American picture books are about feeling grand, having super powers, liking oneself and about looks. They often portray characters who need to feel better about themselves, who show how to accept oneself and how to be proud of who they are.

Some African-American books are also about famous people and slavery.

The books I read in the USA are so different from the books I have grown up with in France, a country with many African influences, especially since the colonial times. The African tales I read and was told about are populated with tales born in Africa and passed on from generation to generation. These tales hint at the folklore, the culture, the nature, the bravery of African people, the feats they have to overcome. Oftentimes the characters were brave, especially when they had to face witches and wild animals. Often the characters were wise and cunning. They also talked to trees, to animals, and to rivers. These tales were also filled with animal tales as in Africa each animal symbolises a quality. I also learned of the savanna, the desert, the fishermen and African villages, of healers, chiefs, and spriritual leaders, of communities and griots (the living libraries). These tales talked about cultures that live overseas.

 

Sussu highlights Kadir Nelson’s illustrations in this post and you KNOW how much I love him! For more of this post, check her out at https://sussu.weebly.com/

Another topic to discuss during Black History Month is the diversity of POC. Not all POC  practice the same religion. That’s why it’s important to include people who identify as Muslim. After all, they are people of color too. Muslim children, especially need to see themselves portrayed positively. Sussu highlights an absolutely ADORABLE book called Nanni’s Hijab.

Nanni is quite the attraction at school with her beautiful hijabs, so it doesn’t come as a surprise when one of her classmates is unappreciative. It is hard for new kids to see all the attention drawn to someone else because, after all, being new should be something that gets people’s attention. Soon, the new classmate, Leslie, tries to bully Nanni, but instead of retaliating, Nanni finds a smart way to solve the issue.  And it’s truly inspiring.

 

It’s a beautifully illustrated picture book that celebrates the hijab and is perfect for all littles: windows and mirrors, remember? Read more about Nanni’s Hijab here.

And speaking of representing Muslims, Sussu features a list of YA books with Muslim characters which includes the new Ms Marvel! Check it out!

Remember, diversity is for everyone. We all learn and grow when we read diverse books.  All of these titles would qualify for the Diversity Reading Challenge!

 

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

On My TBR: Just a Drop of Water – Kerry OMalley Cerra

On My TBR:
Just a Drop of Water – Kerry OMalley Cerra

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Ever since he was little, Jake Green has longed to be a soldier and a hero like his grandpa, who died serving his country. Right now, though, he just wants to outsmart—and outrun—the rival cross country team, the Palmetto Bugs. But then the tragedy of September 11 happens. It’s quickly discovered that one of the hijackers lived nearby, making Jake’s Florida town an FBI hot spot. Two days later, the tragedy becomes even more personal when Jake’s best friend, Sam Madina, is pummeled for being an Arab Muslim by their bully classmate, Bobby.

According to Jake’s personal code of conduct, anyone who beats up your best friend is due for a butt kicking, and so Jake goes after Bobby. But soon after, Sam’s father is detained by the FBI and Jake’s mom doubts the innocence of Sam’s family, forcing Jake to choose between his best friend and his parents. When Jake finds out that Sam’s been keeping secrets, too, he doesn’t know who his allies are anymore. But the final blow comes when his grandpa’s real past is revealed to Jake. Suddenly, everything he ever knew to be true feels like one big lie. In the end, he must decide: either walk away from Sam and the revenge that Bobby has planned, or become the hero he’s always aspired to be.

Having been an adult during September 11th I wanted to see how it impacted kids who were old enough to slightly understand what was going on. My kids were very young at the time so the effect on them is different. Kids Jake’s age would be grown ups now.

How old were you  September 11th 2001?

Categories
2015 Diversity Reading Challenge Books Children

LuLu and the Very Big Meanies A Multicultural Children’s Book Day Book! #ReadYourWorld

I’m preparing for Multicultural Children’s Book Day!

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Multicultural Children’s Book Day is January 27th. Lots of great titles about diverse characters. If you’re in need of titles, pop on over there and check it out. Today I’m thrilled to share with you a great title:

LuLu and the Very Big Meanies

Lulu and the Very Big Meanies by Mac McGooshie and Alexis Hogwood

Here’s the official blurb about it:

Lulu and the Very Big Meanies is the first book in the new series, Lulubug’s Week in the Life: Meet Laila, AKA Lulu, young Muslimah, drama queen extraordinaire, and big-time fashionista! Lulu can’t cut a break this week! First she finds out that she’s moving to a new school and a new town for the next school year, and it’s not even her fault. Then Veronica B. and Veronica C., the most miserable bullies in the world, hand-pick Lulu for their evil plans. Add to that a very sick kitty and the something buzzing in the woods out back, well, Lulu is just not having a great time of it. Even with the help of her friends and family, can she possibly survive the Week of the Very Big Meanies?

Ok so good book, right? But that’s not the HALF of it!! Our heroine, Lulubug is a Muslim American and the ins and outs of her religion are woven into the little one’s life.

That’s the great delight of this book. Every child can relate to LuLu’s everyday trauma of being in school and having bullies, and getting what you want from your parents, etc. But how many of us know what a Muslim child goes through every day?

Honestly? Now we do. LuLu’s life is no different from ours, right? Ok we might not be Muslim but we can certainly can relate to having to wash up for church or do the right thing because that’s what’s expected.  We’re different but we’re the same. To emphasize the similarities between us, I thought it might be fun to complete a word search.

Everyone loves word searches, right?

So why not complete a word search from LuLu’s book that includes Muslim words?

LuLu’s Word Search

Click the link to see the word search.  I’ve included a word bank for you. You’re welcome. See if you recognize any of the words!

MCCBD’s  2015 Sponsors include Platinum Sponsors: Wisdom Tales Press, Daybreak Press Global Bookshop, Gold SponsorsSatya House,  MulticulturalKids.com,   Author Stephen Hodges and the Magic Poof, Silver Sponsors: Junior Library GuildCapstone Publishing, Lee and Low Books,  The Omnibus Publishing. Bronze Sponsors:Double Dutch Dolls, Bliss Group Books, Snuggle with Picture Books Publishing,  Rainbow Books,   Author FeliciaCapers,  Chronicle Books   Muslim Writers Publishing ,East West Discovery Press.