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Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays and that time I met Representative John Lewis

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays
first-book-of-diversity

Welcome to our #diversity countdown to Christmas. Our first book is

March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell

March By John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.”

March is a book for Young Adult readers who prefer the graphic novel format. It’s an easy way to consume history or biographies or other heavily fact laden books. I had the privilege to meet Representative Lewis a few years ago at BEA when this book first came out.

img_0425

Of course it’s a day that I’m dressed all schlumpy; but woo hoooo JOHN  LEWIS!!

It’s no surprise that March won the National Book Award. You can get more info about the March series here.

 

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Diversity Reading Challenge

The Ninja Librarians: Sword in the Stacks by Jen Swann Downey is full of Diversity Fun!

The Ninja Librarians: Sword in the Stacks

 

I’m pretty sure that all the best librarians studied at Petrarch’s Library and became ninja lybrarians. You’ve probably never asked a librarian but if you did, you might discover that they have secret lives which involve time traveling. How do I know? Because I read The Ninja Librarians, that’s why! They are a group of librarians who fight crime and help protect writers whose words have gotten them into trouble. And so, our protagonists, Dorrie and her brother Marcus, enter into the library and discover this cool subversive world. And eventually they get asked to become apprentices.

As apprentices, they move into the library, bunk with their friends, a rag tag group of kids from across the globe and time. It’s a diverse group of other apprentices which will sneakily teach kids about Torquemada and chitons and sword fighting. I love when books sneak teaching in, don’t you?

I love the idea of a secret library that lets you travel back in time. I wish they did exist. Or DO they????? I think this romp would be good for kids who like Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, pirates and ninjas; cuz who doesn’t love pirates?

No one, that’s who.

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Books Children Reviews

Capture the Flag by Kate Messner

Dontcha love a book that references other books?  It’s the BEST!  Capture the Flag by Kate Messner does this and I love it.  One of the heroes in the story carries around his Harry Potter collection and often quotes from them.  Like so:

The boy held up a copy of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, whose pages appeared to be on the verge of spilling out all over the terminal.  The cover was worn and torn, loved to death like Anna’s copy of Harriet the Spy.  The boy grinned.  “This one’s my favorite.”

 

To be sure, I have well-loved books like that too.  Not a feeling you can replicate with an electronic book.  Or can you?

Anyway, I was SO excited to share my review with you that I made a video!

Like to see it?

 

Do you have a fave well-worn book? What is it?

Maybe Capture the Flag will be MINE!

I give this book 4 paws for positive multicultural characters in an interesting and totally believable setting.

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays Day One – March by Senator John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell

The 12 Books of #Diversity
for the Holidays
Day One
first-book-of-diversity

Welcome to our #diversity countdown to Christmas. Our first book is

March by Senator John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell

March By John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.”

March is a book for Young Adult readers who prefer the graphic novel format. It’s an easy way to consume history or biographies or other heavily fact laden books. I had the privilege to meet Senator Lewis a few years ago at BEA when this book first came out.

img_0425

Of course it’s a day that I’m dressed all schlumpy; but woo hoooo SENATOR LEWIS!!

It’s no surprise that March won the National Book Award. You can get more info about the March series here.

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

Forget Politics for a Minute and Look at Rad Women Worldwide by Kate Schatz

Forget Politics for a Minute and Look at
Rad Women Worldwide by Kate Schatz

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Rad Women Worldwide by Kate Schatz is the follow up to the A to Z of rad women that she published last year. I can’t tell you enough how much I love this. If you ever feel like you don’t know enough about life outside your little US bubble, here’s a chance to learn about women all over the globe who are kicking ass.

The book opens with Frida Kahlo, who is an all time fave of mine. Do you know Kalpana Chawla? She was the first female Indian astronaut. Unfortunately, she perished in the tragic Colombia mission of 2003. There’s also Wangari Maathai who was the first East African women to get a PhD. Eventually she became the first environmentalist and the first African woman to win the Nobel peace Prize for sustainable development, democracy and peace.

The list of amazing women includes Maria Montessori, Venus and Serena Williams, Lili’Uokalani of Hawaii, Birute of Canada, and women from Japan, Australia, Burma, and Europe. Did I mention there’s a pirate in the book?

It’s so awesome. Let’s keep this up ladies!

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Books Lists resources

An Unconventional Librarian Holiday Gift Guide

The holidays are just around the corner (eek!) and now’s the time to start thinking about gifts for the bibliophile on your list.  I’m compiling my list and I’m checking it twice, making sure Santa knows what book goes to which lucky reader.
An Unconventional Librarian Holiday Gift Guide
I am now curating books in the following categories:
Cookbooks make great gifts: aka cookbooks for the terrible cook (COOKBOOKS)
Books Dad wants but doesn’t know it (HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY, ROCK AND ROLL)
Books that will keep the little ones busy on Christmas morning and out of Mom’s hair (MIDDLE GRADE AND PICTURE BOOKS)
Books Mom will curl up under the blanket and enjoy: aka Mommy’s Day off! (CHICK LIT, MYSTERY, POP FICTION)
Book related items: bookmarks, book themed clothes, jewelry, etc.
Want your title in this list? Email me at [email protected] SUBJECT: 2015 Holiday gift Guide
Categories
Books Children Reviews

Capture the Flag by Kate Messner

Dontcha love a book that references other books?  It’s the BEST!  Capture the Flag by Kate Messner does this and I love it.  One of the heroes in the story, carries around his Harry Potter collection and often quotes from them.  Like so:

The boy held up a copy of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, whose pages appeared to be on the verge of spilling out all over the terminal.  The cover was worn and torn, loved to death like Anna’s copy of Harriet the Spy.  The boy grinned.  “This one’s my favorite.”

 

To be sure, I have well-loved books like that too.  Not a feeling you can replicate with an electronic book.  Or can you?

Anyway, I was SO excited to share my review with you that I made a video!

Like to see it?

 

Do you have a fave well worn book? What is it?

Maybe Capture the Flag will be MINE!

I give this book 4 paws for positive multicultural characters in an interesting and totally believable setting.

 

Categories
Children Reviews

The Obsidian Mask by Caroline Ludovici

Adventure, intrigue, and precious gems; all items necessary for a good novel, right?  Then you’re in luck if you pick up a copy of The Obsidian Mask by Caroline Ludovici!

Allow me to tempt you a little bit with history.  What’s that you say? History’s not your thing? Maybe not, but reading this book might change your mind.  Ludovici, a charming Brit, has taken the cradle of civilization, ancient Mesopotamia, and turned it into a thriller for middle grade readers.

Imagine ancient Mesopotamia

courtesy How Stuff Works

Look really closely.  You’ll see that the Mesopotamia area crosses over a large portion of the world that has been in the news lately: Syria, Iraq, Turkey, and a teeny part of  Iran.

So what, you say? Well, here’s what: during the course of the novel, four young friends help uncover ancient secrets and are kidnapped because of a very valuable mask that is found in that area.  The mask, belonging to an ancient warrior queen, contains glass known as obsidian, a beautiful, dark, and volcanic glass stone that makes the mask financially priceless.

The glass can look like this:

courtesy Wikipedia

You’ll accidentally learn about history and the Middle East as you read the book.  If you’re like me, you’ll want to know more about the region: what’s the weather like? How did they access water in the desert?  What part of London are the teens from? Who is from Italy?  What in the heck is cuneiform?

Cuneiform is an form of writing.  It’s how ancient people wrote.  Wanna see my name in cuneiform?

I”m not sure what it really says but it prolly says “enjoy this book”!

Which I did and you know what? A second book is coming out next year, how fun will that be??

Stay tuned for more from this exciting series…