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Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays Day 12

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays

Our last book of Diversity is A Blind Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel. It’s the companion book to A Blind Guide to Stinkville, yesterday’s book.

A Bling Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel

Richie “Ryder” Raymond has a gift. He can find the punchline in any situation, even in his limited vision and prosthetic eye. During the past year at Addison School for the Blind, Ryder’s quick wit earned the respect and friendship of his classmates. Heading to mainstream, or “normal,” school for eighth grade is going to be awesome.

After all, what’s not to like? At Addison, Ryder was everyone’s favorite person. He could make anyone laugh, especially his best friend Alice. So long as he can be first to make all of the one-eyed jokes, Ryder is sure he’ll fit in just as quick at Papuaville Middle School, home of the Fighting Guinea Pigs. But Alice warns him fitting in might not be as easy as he thinks.

Turns out, Alice was right. In just the first hour of “normal” school, Ryder is attacked by General MacCathur II (aka, Gramps’s cat), causes his bio teacher to pass out cold, makes an enemy out town hero Max, and falls for Jocelyn, the fierce girl next door who happens to be Max’s girlfriend. On top of that, Ryder struggles to hold onto his dignity in the face of students’ pity and Gramps’s non-stop practical jokes.

Ryder quickly sees the only thing worse than explaining a joke is being the punchline. But with help from his stuck-in-the-70s Gramps and encouragement from Alice, Ryder finds the strength to not only fight back, but to make peace.

If you’re like me, you love companion books so you can follow how your old friends are doing and make new friends too.

Here’s hoping I gave you some ideas about diverse books to pick up for next year. And speaking of next year, be on the lookout in a few days for the announcement for the 2017 Diversity Reading Challenge!

Wishing you a Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, and a good Kwanzaa.

Categories
Children Diversity Reading Challenge

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays Day 5

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays

Beautiful by Stacy McNaulty

On the fifth day of the Diversity Countdown we have Beautiful by Stacy McNaultyJoanne Lew-Vriethoff

Every girl is unique, talented, and lovable. . . .Every girl is BEAUTIFUL.
Much more than how one looks on the outside, true beauty is found in conquering challenges, showing kindness, and spreading contagious laughter. Beautiful girls are empowered and smart and strong!
BEAUTIFUL breaks barriers by showing girls free to be themselves: splashing in mud, conducting science experiments, and reading books under a flashlight with friends. This book will encourage all girls to embrace who they are and realize their endless potential.

I LOVE LOVE LOVE the illustrations in this adorable picture book. It shows girls of every race, ability, etc, doing what girls do; which is everything. A great way to break those gender stereotypes that kids start to believe in their preschool years.

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 12 – A Blind Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 12

Welcome to day 12! Our last book of Diversity is A Blind Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel. It’s the companion book to A Blind Guide to Stinkville, yesterday’s book.

A Bling Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel

Richie “Ryder” Raymond has a gift. He can find the punchline in any situation, even in his limited vision and prosthetic eye. During the past year at Addison School for the Blind, Ryder’s quick wit earned the respect and friendship of his classmates. Heading to mainstream, or “normal,” school for eighth grade is going to be awesome.

After all, what’s not to like? At Addison, Ryder was everyone’s favorite person. He could make anyone laugh, especially his best friend Alice. So long as he can be first to make all of the one-eyed jokes, Ryder is sure he’ll fit in just as quick at Papuaville Middle School, home of the Fighting Guinea Pigs. But Alice warns him fitting in might not be as easy as he thinks.

Turns out, Alice was right. In just the first hour of “normal” school, Ryder is attacked by General MacCathur II (aka, Gramps’s cat), causes his bio teacher to pass out cold, makes an enemy out town hero Max, and falls for Jocelyn, the fierce girl next door who happens to be Max’s girlfriend. On top of that, Ryder struggles to hold onto his dignity in the face of students’ pity and Gramps’s non-stop practical jokes.

Ryder quickly sees the only thing worse than explaining a joke is being the punchline. But with help from his stuck-in-the-70s Gramps and encouragement from Alice, Ryder finds the strength to not only fight back, but to make peace.

If you’re like me, you love companion books so you can follow how your old friends are doing and make new friends too.

Here’s hoping I gave you some ideas about diverse books to pick up for next year. And speaking of next year, be on the lookout in a few days for the announcement for the 2017 Diversity Reading Challenge!

Wishing you a Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, and a good Kwanzaa.

Categories
Children Diversity Reading Challenge

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 5 – Beautiful by Stacy McNaulty, Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

The 12 Books of #Diversity
for the Holidays
Day Five

Beautiful by Stacy McNaulty

On the fifth day of the Diversity Countdown we have Beautiful by Stacy McNaultyJoanne Lew-Vriethoff

Every girl is unique, talented, and lovable. . . .Every girl is BEAUTIFUL.
Much more than how one looks on the outside, true beauty is found in conquering challenges, showing kindness, and spreading contagious laughter. Beautiful girls are empowered and smart and strong!
BEAUTIFUL breaks barriers by showing girls free to be themselves: splashing in mud, conducting science experiments, and reading books under a flashlight with friends. This book will encourage all girls to embrace who they are and realize their endless potential.

I LOVE LOVE LOVE the illustrations in this adorable picture book. It shows girls of every race, ability, etc, doing what girls do; which is everything. A great way to break those gender stereotypes that kids start to believe in their preschool years.

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Lists

Diversity New Releases for Toddlers through YA

Diversity New Releases for toddlers through YA

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You know I love bringing you diversity book reviews, right? Today I’m bringing you a list of new books that contain diversity and the best bit is, there’s one book for every age group: toddler through YA!

  1. Beautiful by Stacy McAnulty Illustrated by Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

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I love this book so HARD. You know how I love opening lines? The opening line here is simple: “Beautiful girls…”
And the graphic contains five girls of different colors doing what they do best, being themselves.  What’s especially great is the back of the drawing, on the next page, shows the backsides of the girls: the girl wearing the tutu and sporting a fan also wears a pirate’s sword, which feels alot like yours truly.  The rest of the book is full of beautiful girls in wheelchairs, camping, pirating, in a science lab, playing in water with frogs and other critters, and more! Girls activities reimagined.  The last line: “Because they make the world..” Reminds me of the old Chinese saying that women hold up half the sky. Beautiful girls make the world?

Yes.

2. Kid Artists: True Tales of Childhood From Creative Legends by David Stabler, Illustrated by Doogie Horner

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Quirk has done it again! Ever imagine what your favorite artist was like as a kid? Here it is. For example, did you know that the great artist Frida Kahlo (whom I love) suffered from polio as a child?  And did you know that Pablo Picasso was labeled as a problem child? There’s also interesting very short readable bios about Leonardo da Vinci, Charles Schulz, Andy Warhol, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Check it out!

3. The Last Cherry Blossom by Kathleen Burkinshaw

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Based on a fictionalized account of her mother’s childhood during the bombing of Hiroshima it’s a tale of war through a 12 year old’s eyes.

Yuriko was happy growing up in Hiroshima when it was just her and Papa. But her aunt Kimiko and her cousin Genji are living with them now, and the family is only getting bigger with talk of a double marriage! And while things are changing at home, the world beyond their doors is even more unpredictable. World War II is coming to an end, and Japan’s fate is not entirely clear, with any battle losses being hidden fom its people. Yuriko is used to the sirens and the air-raid drills, but things start to feel more real when the neighbors who have left to fight stop coming home. When the bomb hits Hiroshima, it’s through Yuriko’s twelve-year-old eyes that we witness the devastation and horror.

 

Right? If you think you’ve read all the WWII books there are, you haven’t read this. Teachers, I think this title could be added to your collection, right next to Anne Frank.

So you know what else I just noticed? All these books are about kids who are BEAUTIFUL and DIVERSE. Have you read any of these titles?

Diversity Reading Challenge additions galore today!

Categories
2015 Diversity Reading Challenge

An Unconventional Librarian’s 2015 #DiversityReadingChallenge

IT’S TIME FOR DIVERSITY!

I’ve been wanting to start my own reading challenge and I’ve finally done it! Let’s ring in 2015 with a reading challenge that celebrates the multicultural reader and challenges the status quo.

Presenting the Diversity Reading Challenge!fd

DIVERSITY CHALLENGECollage

 

This challenge pairs well with almost any other challenge you’re participating in; there are multicultural books in every genre. If you’re new to reading diverse books, you’ll be hooked. If you’re an avid consumer of multicultural reads, then this challenge will suit you just fine.  There are no complicated rules to this challenge; participate how you want, when you want.

Wanna chat about books? Tweet me @pamlovesbooks with #DiversityReadingChallenge, leave a comment here, or leave a link to your #DiversityReadingChallenge page! Let’s keep this conversation going…

Categories
Books

King for a Day by Rukhsana Khan

If there was ever a book that combined everything I love about reading this is it! Taking place in Lahore, young Malik and his sibs participate in the annual kite festival.  What I love about this book is that young Malik is in a wheelchair! I love that he is differently abled and while his representation is noted it’s not THE thing that the book hangs on. He’s just a boy who’s wicked good at flying a kite. 90 thousand star rating.

I love this book so much I thought I’d share it with you in a reading. Wanna see it? Check out the illustrations, they are GORGEOUS!

Isn’t that the best story ever?

Thank you Lee & Low for this book!

KINGFORADAY