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Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays Day 12

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays

Our last book of Diversity is A Blind Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel. It’s the companion book to A Blind Guide to Stinkville, yesterday’s book.

A Bling Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel

Richie “Ryder” Raymond has a gift. He can find the punchline in any situation, even in his limited vision and prosthetic eye. During the past year at Addison School for the Blind, Ryder’s quick wit earned the respect and friendship of his classmates. Heading to mainstream, or “normal,” school for eighth grade is going to be awesome.

After all, what’s not to like? At Addison, Ryder was everyone’s favorite person. He could make anyone laugh, especially his best friend Alice. So long as he can be first to make all of the one-eyed jokes, Ryder is sure he’ll fit in just as quick at Papuaville Middle School, home of the Fighting Guinea Pigs. But Alice warns him fitting in might not be as easy as he thinks.

Turns out, Alice was right. In just the first hour of “normal” school, Ryder is attacked by General MacCathur II (aka, Gramps’s cat), causes his bio teacher to pass out cold, makes an enemy out town hero Max, and falls for Jocelyn, the fierce girl next door who happens to be Max’s girlfriend. On top of that, Ryder struggles to hold onto his dignity in the face of students’ pity and Gramps’s non-stop practical jokes.

Ryder quickly sees the only thing worse than explaining a joke is being the punchline. But with help from his stuck-in-the-70s Gramps and encouragement from Alice, Ryder finds the strength to not only fight back, but to make peace.

If you’re like me, you love companion books so you can follow how your old friends are doing and make new friends too.

Here’s hoping I gave you some ideas about diverse books to pick up for next year. And speaking of next year, be on the lookout in a few days for the announcement for the 2017 Diversity Reading Challenge!

Wishing you a Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, and a good Kwanzaa.

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays Day 11

The 12 Books of #Diversity

On the 11th day of Diversity let’s talk about The Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel

A Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel

Here’s what I like about these books: they are about children who are visually disabled in some way. In the first book, Alice has albinism and is blind.

I can’t think of any books lately that have included albinism or visually impaired children as the main characters. So much to learn about those topics.

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 12 – A Blind Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 12

Welcome to day 12! Our last book of Diversity is A Blind Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel. It’s the companion book to A Blind Guide to Stinkville, yesterday’s book.

A Bling Guide to Normal by Beth Vrabel

Richie “Ryder” Raymond has a gift. He can find the punchline in any situation, even in his limited vision and prosthetic eye. During the past year at Addison School for the Blind, Ryder’s quick wit earned the respect and friendship of his classmates. Heading to mainstream, or “normal,” school for eighth grade is going to be awesome.

After all, what’s not to like? At Addison, Ryder was everyone’s favorite person. He could make anyone laugh, especially his best friend Alice. So long as he can be first to make all of the one-eyed jokes, Ryder is sure he’ll fit in just as quick at Papuaville Middle School, home of the Fighting Guinea Pigs. But Alice warns him fitting in might not be as easy as he thinks.

Turns out, Alice was right. In just the first hour of “normal” school, Ryder is attacked by General MacCathur II (aka, Gramps’s cat), causes his bio teacher to pass out cold, makes an enemy out town hero Max, and falls for Jocelyn, the fierce girl next door who happens to be Max’s girlfriend. On top of that, Ryder struggles to hold onto his dignity in the face of students’ pity and Gramps’s non-stop practical jokes.

Ryder quickly sees the only thing worse than explaining a joke is being the punchline. But with help from his stuck-in-the-70s Gramps and encouragement from Alice, Ryder finds the strength to not only fight back, but to make peace.

If you’re like me, you love companion books so you can follow how your old friends are doing and make new friends too.

Here’s hoping I gave you some ideas about diverse books to pick up for next year. And speaking of next year, be on the lookout in a few days for the announcement for the 2017 Diversity Reading Challenge!

Wishing you a Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, and a good Kwanzaa.

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge Young Adult

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the Holidays DAY 11-The Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel

The 12 Books of #Diversity for the 11

On the 11th day of Diversity let’s talk about The Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel

A Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel

Here’s what I like about these books: they are about children who are visually disabled in some way. In the first book, Alice has albinism and is blind.

I can’t think of any books lately that have included albinism or visually impaired children as the main characters. So much to learn about those topics.

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Dewey's Read-a-thon Diversity Reading Challenge

Dewey’s 24 Hour #Readathon : Hour 17 Diversity Shelfie Mini Challenge!

Hour 17 Diversity Shelfie Mini Challenge!

If you’re reading a book that contains diverse characters we want to see them! Get out your cameras and take a photo of a diverse book you love or want to read; it’s time for a Diversity Shelfie! Whether you’re in the shot or not show us your diverse book. Tweet a photo, and a title of a diverse book with hashtag #Diversityshelfie to @pamlovesbooks

It’ll be late so if you don’t want to show yourself you don’t have to. Just show us your book!

deweys readathon

 

I’ll chose a random winner and announce it Sunday evening. The winner may choose a prize from the Prizes page at 24hourreadathon.com.  You’ll need to fill out the form noting that you are an hourly challenge winner and the name of the challenge (Diversity).

 

KEEP GOING, YOU CAN DO IT!!