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Banned Books

Banned Book Week: Here’s Another Tough Question

Banned Book Week:
Here’s another tough question

bbw16prompt2

That’s a tough one: probably Scout. So I can show her how the world has changed.

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Books Diversity Reading Challenge

Banned Book Week: Have you read this banned book?

Banned Book Week:

Have you read this banned book?

 

And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

tango

In the zoo there are all kinds of animal families. But Tango’s family is not like any of the others. This illustrated children’s book fictionalizes the true story of two male penguins who became partners and raised a penguin chick in the Central Park Zoo.

I love this book so hard. SO HARD y’all. It’s an absolutely adorbs depiction of family life. And kids love penguins so, what’s the problem, right?  The problem is that the two penguins are males and some folks think that a picture book for the littles shouldn’t include depictions of homosexuality.

As with all things, I think you should give it a read before you judge. And also? I don’t think kids care so much about two mommies or two daddies as long as they are loved. If you’ve read it, it counts toward the Diversity Reading Challenge.

Categories
Books Diversity Reading Challenge

Banned Book Week: Have You Read This Banned Book?

Banned Book Week:
Have you read this banned book?

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D Taylor

Roll of Thunder

 

Why is the land so important to Cassie’s family? It takes the events of one turbulent year—the year of the night riders and the burnings, the year a white girl humiliates Cassie in public simply because she’s black—to show Cassie that having a place of their own is the Logan family’s lifeblood. It is the land that gives the Logans their courage and pride—no matter how others may degrade them, the Logans possess something no one can take away.

Is there anyone who hasn’t read Roll of Thunder? It’s a moving piece of literature for tweens to help them understand the lives of African Americans. It’s also just, GOOD. WRITING.  Written in the 70’s, this book is still frequently challenged today for its expression of racial themes and use of the “n” word. One family in Florida challenged it because they didn’t think it was appropriate for their own son, who was African American. They decided to keep the book but provided more sensitivity training to the teachers, which I think is a great idea. Here’s hoping that any teachers who include this book are teaching it as sensitively as they can. There’s so much to learn from this book.

If you’ve not read this book, why not try it? It’s a great addition to the Diversity Reading Challenge, too.