Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

Pink is for Boys by Robb Pearlman, Illustrated by Eda Kaban

Pink is for Boys

 

 

A little guy, who is now a young man, once told me, when I complimented him on his blue nail polish that “Blue is for everyone” and I never forgot that thought. Why? Because it’s true. Colors don’t belong to people.

Pink is for Boys is the cutest ding dang book I’ve seen all year! I’m not sure when colors began as boy or girl colors but I think it’s a ridiculous practice that should have ended decades ago. What Pink is for Boys points out is that colors are for everyone! The opening illustrations show children of all ethnicities wearing pink clothes in a pink room, dancing, singing and having a party to alert the reader that pink is for everyone.

Blue is for girls, by the way, in case you didn’t know. And it’s also for boys. Especially when they are wearing baseball uniforms and play on a team. Let’s not forget that yellow is the color of stars and crowns. Throughout the book the reader is bombarded with the positive message that colors are not gender specific AND the children are multiethnic and have differing abilities.

I love this book so hard. If you have little ones in your home, add this to your library ASAP because colors are for EVERYONE.

(crying)

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

Have you Read: The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson, a 2018 #Cybils Middle Grade winner?

The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

There is SO MUCH to love about this title! The Parker Inheritance has something for everyone:

  • Black History
  • Friendship
  • Bullying
  • Divorce
  • LGBTQ
  • A Mystery to solve

Take all of those ingredients and what comes out is an award winning book. Readers will love how Johnson took his time drawing our main characters into the story making sure to draw fully fleshed out personalities. Brandon and Candice try to solve a puzzle to clear Candice’s late grandmother’s name. And oh what a mystery it is. From learning about Jim Crow laws in the South to modern day experiences of bullying by adults and children, these two form a true friendship built on trust. And they might win a bunch of money too. What’s not to love about that?

The Parker Inheritance is having a great year: A Cybils award, my blog, a Diversity Reading Challenge feature, and Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Honor Award! Way to go Parker Inheritance!

If you’re keeping track, The Parker Inheritance ticks off the box for an African American young woman as the main character.

Bam.

 

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

Have you Read Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson?

Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson

How much do we love Jacqueline Woodson? Infinity. Thats how much we love her. Her books are always timely and Harbor Me is no exception.  This thin, powerful book will hook you from word one.

It all starts when six kids have to meet for a weekly chat—by themselves, with no adults to listen in. There, in the room they soon dub the ARTT Room (short for “A Room to Talk”), they discover it’s safe to talk about what’s bothering them—everything from Esteban’s father’s deportation and Haley’s father’s incarceration to Amari’s fears of racial profiling and Ashton’s adjustment to his changing family fortunes. When the six are together, they can express the feelings and fears they have to hide from the rest of the world. And together, they can grow braver and more ready for the rest of their lives.

How great is it that special needs kids can feel free to be themselves in this special classroom just for them? It’s a strange and beautiful experience all at once. So many issues to unpack with these kids and they do it too, in their own beautiful ways of understanding. I wept.

How does Woodson do it?

Another book for the Diversity Reading Challenge!

Harbor me ticks off many boxes but the one I’m choosing is Latinx person because Esteban is a main character in this ensemble cast. You could choose another category if you want. Thats the ease of this challenge. Boom.

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

Front Desk by Kelly Yang, a #Cybils middle grade finalist

Front Desk by Kelly Yang

If you’re looking for a book to share with your Asian American friends, here’s a book for you. It’s so great to see our young Asian friends depicted in books, isn’t it? Young Mia is the child of immigrants and boy have they had a rough time in America. They go from living in their car to being caretakers of a motel owned by the evilest of villians, Mr. Yao. Mia struggles to make friends, be a good Chinese person, plus become the American girl she wants to become. It’s difficult and you can feel for her. It’s a sweet story with charming moments that I’m sure everyone can relate to, not just immigrants.

Front Desk also is a multiple award winner: Cybils, my blog, The Diversity Reading Challenge, and the ALA Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature. Congrats Kelly Yang!

Need a book for the Diversity Reading Challenge? Front Desk fits the bill.

An Asian main character. Isn’t it great that the world finally gets to see more authors of color?

 

 

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson a #Cybils middle grade finalist

Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson

How much do we love Jacqueline Woodson? Infinity. Thats how much we love her. Her books are always timely and Harbor Me is no exception.  This thin, powerful book will hook you from word one.

It all starts when six kids have to meet for a weekly chat—by themselves, with no adults to listen in. There, in the room they soon dub the ARTT Room (short for “A Room to Talk”), they discover it’s safe to talk about what’s bothering them—everything from Esteban’s father’s deportation and Haley’s father’s incarceration to Amari’s fears of racial profiling and Ashton’s adjustment to his changing family fortunes. When the six are together, they can express the feelings and fears they have to hide from the rest of the world. And together, they can grow braver and more ready for the rest of their lives.

How great is it that special needs kids can feel free to be themselves in this special classroom just for them? It’s a strange and beautiful experience all at once. So many issues to unpack with these kids and they do it too, in their own beautiful ways of understanding. I wept.

How does Woodson do it?

Another book for the Diversity Reading Challenge!

Harbor me ticks off many boxes but the one I’m choosing is Latinx person because Esteban is a main character in this ensemble cast. You could choose another category if you want. Thats the ease of this challenge.

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson, a #Cybils Middle Grade winner!

The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

There is SO MUCH to love about this title! The Parker Inheritance has something for everyone:

  • Black History
  • Friendship
  • Bullying
  • Divorce
  • LGBTQ
  • A Mystery to solve

Take all of those ingredients and what comes out is an award winning book. Readers will love how Johnson took his time drawing our main characters into the story making sure to draw fully fleshed out personalities. Brandon and Candice try to solve a puzzle to clear Candice’s late grandmother’s name. And oh what a mystery it is. From learning about Jim Crow laws in the South to modern day experiences of bullying by adults and children, these two form a true friendship built on trust. And they might win a bunch of money too. What’s not to love about that?

The Parker Inheritance is having a great year: A Cybils award, my blog, a Diversity Reading Challenge feature, and Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Honor Award! Way to go Parker Inheritance!

If you’re keeping track, The Parker Inheritance ticks off the box for an African American young woman as the main character.

 

 

 

Categories
Children Diversity Reading Challenge

The ONE book you need for Valentine’s Day: LOVE by Stacy McAnulty and Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

LOVE by Stacy McAnulty and
Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

Stacy McAnulty really knows how to tug at your heartstrings no matter what age group she’s writing for.  You remember Stacy, right?

She wrote Beautiful a couple years ago:

Reminding us that there is no one definition of beauty.

And now for Valentine’s Day they’ve teamed up again and written: Love. It’s so so so ADORBS. I can’t stand how adorable it is! The text is so easy to understand that even the youngest reader will understand what Love is: giving food to your dog or bringing flowers to someone in bed. Get it. It’s so beautiful. And the ILLUSTRATIONS?? People of every size or shape or representation are included. I feel seen.

 

You know what? Love could totally qualify for the Diversity Reading Challenge.

Categories
Diversity Reading Challenge

The 2019 Diversity Reading Challenge is HERE!

Let’s check out the categories:





I’ve designed this reading challenge to fit in with just about every other challenge you participate; the only catch is, the books must contain diversity. You can make the challenge as simple or as complicated as you like; but hey, surely you can read 12 books in 12 months, right? It’s just one book a month. Just make sure that each month you read a book that contains diversity.

  1. by or about a Latinx person
  2. a main character has a mental illness
  3. by or about someone who is overweight
  4. an African American young woman as main character
  5. an Asian main character
  6. an illustrator of color
  7. graphic novel
  8. a Muslim main character
  9. an African American young man on the cover
  10. main character has a physical disability
  11. LGBTQ main character
  12. children who are refugees or displaced