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Banned Books Books

Banned Books Week

Why were these books banned?

1. I Am Jazz by Jessica Hershel and Jazz Jennings

I Am Jazz

Here’s my review. Hint: I loved it!

2. Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan

Two Boys Kissing isn’t my favorite book but that doesn’t mean it needs to be banned! I didn’t care for the choir of people in the background. But  the book is  totally suitable for teens.

3. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

I read this the year it came out. Also another trip to BEA to meet the author (oh the perks of working in a bookstore)! Not sure why there’s no review.  I LOVE THIS BOOK SO HARD.

 

 

4.  It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

I am completely unfamiliar with this book but it appears to be designed to talk to kids about
their changing bodies and sex. Knowledge is power, people. We don’t want a bunch of hormone
enraged middle schoolers doing things that they don’t know the consequences of. This reminds me of those
great books by the American Girl doll people who discuss puberty with young tweens. Kids need to know that
it’s all perfectly normal, even if it feels weird.

I do NOT think this is pornography, but you be the judge.

 

5.  The Color Purple By Alice Walker

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It may seem trite to discuss The Color Purple because it seems as if everyone is familiar with this important title.  The thing of it is, I read this book in college shortly after it came out.  Back then it was an interesting and difficult read but I had no idea how it would rock the literary and African American community.  Personally I was angry, sad, and confused by the treatment of the female protagonists.

Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of women of color in the southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture.

It is for these reasons that the book is challenged and banned.  The situations seem so violent and yet so personal that it’s no wonder The Color Purple is on the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books list. I think the main reason The Color Purple is so frequently challenged is that schools are concerned about exposing students to sexual violence and other aggressions.  I suppose depending on what age the students are reading the material that could be true. You certainly don’t want a child younger than 16 reading this book, but these are my personal feelings and I wouldn’t subject them on others.  For the right age group, the book is excellent insight into race and women in the South.

What are your thoughts on The Color Purple?

Come on people. It’s time to stop banning books.

 

By Pam

My passion is advocating for diversity in children's and YA literature.